Download A Concise Companion to Shakespeare on Screen (Concise by Diana E. Henderson PDF

By Diana E. Henderson

This Concise significant other provides a multidisciplinary diversity of techniques to an unlimited multimedia topic, Shakespeare on reveal. The book’s participants use the most recent pondering from cultural experiences, communications, and comparative media, in discussion with literary, theatrical, and filmic techniques, for you to push the sphere ahead. they give thought to Shakespeare on monitor not just as a suite of entire items but in addition as a approach. accordingly, the quantity is equipped round issues reminiscent of authorship and collaboration, theatricality, intercourse and violence, globalization, and background. The Concise significant other deals readers quite a few obtainable routes into Shakespeare on monitor and helps additional learn of the topic throughout the inclusion of a bibliography, a chronological chart, and an intensive index. whilst, it serves as a focus for exploring primary matters within the examine of literature and tradition extra greatly, comparable to the relationships among elite and pop culture, artwork and undefined, textual content, snapshot, and function.

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Extra resources for A Concise Companion to Shakespeare on Screen (Concise Companions to Literature and Culture)

Sample text

That’s why it’s easy for us to get a gun and shoot each other. . If we were taught to feel we wouldn’t be so violent. . If we . . have no feelings then we say things to each other that don’t mean anything. But if we felt what we said – we’d say less and mean more. Pacino and Kimball appear transfixed by this speech and agree emphatically (chiming in several times off-camera). The man then turns to ask a businessman for change, and the camera lingers for a moment before a cut. The poignancy of the moment, the revelation that the most impassioned speech comes from the mouth of a beggar, appears to confirm the filmmakers’ belief that Shakespeare speaks to everyone at the precise moment that Pacino’s quest is thrown into relief as luxurious.

The “tension between text and image is one of the strongest motifs in critical evaluations of Shakespeare on screen” along with the tension between (rather than possibilities in combining) “theatricality” and “visual media” (Simone 1998: 233). Critics such as James Agee and Normand Berlin focused on cuts, the percentage of Shakespearean lines included, evaluating according to degrees of fidelity and/or distortion (in terms of how well the visuals served the language). There was also a prevalent concern that the powerful, primarily visual, “realist” nature of film would displace the stylized integrity of Shakespeare’s plays.

But if we felt what we said – we’d say less and mean more. Pacino and Kimball appear transfixed by this speech and agree emphatically (chiming in several times off-camera). The man then turns to ask a businessman for change, and the camera lingers for a moment before a cut. The poignancy of the moment, the revelation that the most impassioned speech comes from the mouth of a beggar, appears to confirm the filmmakers’ belief that Shakespeare speaks to everyone at the precise moment that Pacino’s quest is thrown into relief as luxurious.

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